Napoleon Apollo 300 Charcoal Smoker Review

Napoleon Apollo 300 Charcoal Smoker

$400
9

Construction Quality

9.0/10

Temperature Control

9.0/10

Efficiency

9.0/10

Usability

9.0/10

Capacity

9.0/10

Pros

  • Sectional design allows this smoker to adjust to your needs
  • Large capacity vertical water smoker
  • Nice features like built support for rib racks and temperature probe eyelets

Cons

  • All those sections allow for smoke leakage
  • No heat deflector under the smoker so it can get very hot underneath
  • Built with pop rivets that would be difficult to repair

Specifications

  • Two 20-inch diameter cooking grates for about 630 square inches of smoking space
  • One top and three bottom air vents
  • Three section design converts this to a smaller smoker or a charcoal grill with locking latches for assembly
  • Lid has five meat hooks for hanging ribs or sausage
  • 2.6-gallon water pan
  • Each section has a temperature probe eyelet for temperature monitoring
  • Made in Canada by Napoleon Grills

Full Review – Napoleon Apollo 300 Charcoal Smoker

If Weber makes a product you can bet that there is something to match from Napoleon grills. This now holds true for Weber's Smokey Mountain Cooker. Napoleon licensed the ProQ Smoker back in 2010 and rebranded it as the Napoleon Apollo 3 in 1 smoker. While Weber prides itself on simplicity, this smoker makes the most of its potential by adding in everything that makes sense, and maybe a few things that don't.

The Weber Smokey Mountain has become the iconic backyard vertical water smoker. Easy to use, predictable, and long-lasting, this smoker has fansites on the internet and gatherings of users. Like the Apollo 3 in 1, the Smokey Mountain has a charcoal fire pan in the bottom, a large water pan above that and two cooking racks above that. There are three vents in the bottom and one in the top for temperature control and both have a lid mounted thermometer to tell you the cooking temperature. Here is where the similarities end.

The Apollo Smoker is a barrel standing on end, cut into four sections, a base where the fire sites, a lid, and two middle sections, each with an access door. The smoker can convert from something similar to the Weber with all sections together into a basic, 20-inch diameter charcoal grill. Put in one of the smoker sections to make a small smoker that will require less charcoal and is perfect for smaller cooks. Altogether, this is actually a big smoker with about 630 square inches of smoking space. Divided up there is around 315 square inches of either smoking or grilling space.

Inside the lid of the Apollo Smoker is a steel rod from which can hang the five included metal hooks for racks of ribs or sausage or anything else that might smoke better vertically. There are small eyelets in the each section of the body for temperature probes (not included). The small access doors in will let you in, but just like the Weber, they are lightweight and will need to be bent to get them to fit properly. Locking latches hold the sections together so that the whole smoker can be easily moved in one piece (something the Weber is not very good at). Each section as two metal handles on the sides and there is a handle on the lid. All of these parts are pop riveted into place, not something I am fond of on a cooker where corrosion and time can wear them out, but this isn't much of a weakness.